Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Treating with Neoplasene

As I've mentioned in prior posts about how I treat cancer in your pets, the new drug Neoplasene is an amazing addition to my arsenal of homeopathic remedies. I always tell clients that they are critical to my patients' care, for several reasons.

The treatment can be felt. There may be a mild, immediate burn or itch. Cancerous tissue will swell and feel sore once the reaction begins, as the immune system is kickstarted and must process the dying cancer cells. The immune system works through the production of inflammation. This is a natural and very effective process that the body uses to heal most any problem. Often, with surface tumors, there is a reddened ring of healthy skin visible around a thin, grey ring of macerated, or softened, dead tissue which rims the tumor. Additionally, the entire surface of the tumor will likely become grey and macerated as it approaches sloughing. The dying cancer tissue is being rejected by the body.

Good wound management is critical. With this loss of the diseased tissue, there will be an open wound which must be well managed for successful treatment. It must be kept moist with an appropriate wound salve. It is important not to allow a hard scab to form. Be aware that scarring may very well occur as the body works to heal the wound left behind by the vacated tumor. In two to ten days the dead tissue will slough off. If this takes more than five days, there is probably living tumor present, and continued application is called for. The shedding of dying tissue should not be forced. It must be allowed to fall off naturally. Forced removal will often create bleeding and leave bits of surviving tumor behind. Licking, rubbing, chewing and scratching must be prevented, as mentioned above. And, it must be left to heal as an open wound. In our modern medical culture it is not very common to allow large wounds to heal in an open manner. The common urge is to suture the wound closed. Nice, neat, clean. However, it is best not to do so. Continued sloughing and drainage of discharge must be allowed to occur without interference.

Rarely, cancer may reappear long after the treatment series with Neoplasene has ended. This can happen because not all of the diseased tissue was destroyed, or because the conditions that caused the cancer in the first place still exist and can recreate it from scratch. The good news is that there is no evidence of development of resistance by surviving cancer cells.

There's more to say about Neoplasene, but I'll save that for my next post.

25 comments:

Maria Racz said...

the neoplasene salve is an amezing thing. I have a 13 years(today) old vizsla, the first tumor appeared after he turned 9, I have surgically(I am a surgical dental assistant) removed it,under local anes, than a year later nearby another appeared, than removed, under from his tail. Than 6 months ago another appeared by his buthole, than I met a holistic vet, she gave me the neoplasene salve,it has so far 3 tumor came to surface from the same spot.Wound is healing well.Hi is loosing weight, I feed him cooked chicken too... any coment? Maria

Dr. Michele Yasson, DVM said...

Yes, my experience with Neoplasene is very positive. One of the great benefits is that it will bring out locations of tumors that were undetectable otherwise. That can be life saving.

Brooke said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Tanya said...

Is there anything I can do naturally for my cat? I am unemployed. I love my cat dearly but she is 16 years old. I went to my vet and she diagnosed her with Neoplasia. She gave her antibiotics to help the swelling and it clearly up. She was able to breathe better. Now it's back and she won't give me another dose. I am looking for a natural antibiotic to help her breathe.

Anonymous said...

My dog is on the oral neoplasene for an osteosarcoma. She started 9 days ago and it seems the tumor has actually increased in size and she now has edema on the leg immediately below the tumor. Is this "normal" for this treatment?

Dr. Michele Yasson, DVM said...

@Tanya. The antibiotic is unlikely to help a second time. You may be able to paliate and support her with home prep diet and supplements. Call me at the office for details if you like.

@Anon. The sudden cell death of the cancer that is the desired result of treatment by Neoplasene will generate an inflammatory immune response that can include swelling. This can cause issues like this if the mass is on a limb where the swelling can act like a tourniquet to slow blood flow to the lower limb. Massage, elevating the limb, and alternating warm/cold applic. can help. Ask your vet for guidance with these measures. And your vet may want to consider some antiinflammatory drugs. Although they are considered contraindicated by the formulator, Dr Fox, I have found judicious use to be helpful in managing some cases.

Anonymous said...

Hi Dr. Yasson,

I was wondering if, in your experience, oral Neoplasene causes open wounds?

My cat has a jaw tumor (probably SCC) and we are going to try oral Neo. My vet (who has never used Neo) and I are both concerned about the possibility of an open wound in or around his mouth forming, causing pain, becoming infected, and/or making it hard for him to eat/drink. Unfortunately, I haven't found much info about oral use. We want to know what to anticipate as we are both going into this blind.

Dr. Michele Yasson, DVM said...

Oral Neoplasene can cause open wounds, though they develop more slowly than with injectible or topical and can be controlled more easily. Wound and pain management is always a vital part of treatment with Neoplasene. Good luck with the treatment.

Anonymous said...

Dr. Yasson, I have a question...My poodle just had his 2nd, treatment of Neoplasene, he has cancer in his jaw, lower left side....He has lost 2 tumors so far but after this treatment 4 days ago, the smell is so foul! Is that normal...He just started eating again 2 days ago....But all he will eat is hip pedigree, the vet told me give him anything he will eat...he was starving...I did try the organic beef and chicken cooked in organic gravies...he wouldn't even touch them for 2 weeks, that scared me ..he is getting boney....and that is not good...he is 13 yrs old..
Jani

Dr. Michele Yasson, DVM said...

I am impressed with your dedication, Jani. I, too, have a poodle. I just finished a freezing snowshoe romp in the woods with him. What a fabulous, courageous breed!

Your guy may be having some infection due to the food since he just started eating again. Or it could be that the Neoplasene is actually doing its job and causing the cancerous tissue to decay. That would have a very bad odor. Homeopathy can help if you get stuck.

You are right to feed him whatever he will eat right now. See my Taste Tempters page http://www.holvet.net/cat_taste_tempters.html for more help. It is labeled "for cats" but the info is great for dogs, too. Good luck.

Anonymous said...

Hi Dr. Yasson -- I posted 2 months ago about using oral Neo for my cat's jaw tumor. Thank you for responding. We started the treatment the following week, building up to 2.4 cc/d mixed in his food. Lots of inflammation which eventually drained (like an abscess). No open wound ever formed. This dose appeared to keep the tumor suppressed for 6 weeks, and his anemia even reversed (!). Then he had a Herpes URI flare and didn't eat much. We didn't sweat it since he was doing so well, so for a week or so only got half the dose of Neo. BOOM! Tumor growth took off and the thing tripled in size. We have inc'd the Neo to 3 cc/d (22 mg/kg bid as per Buck Mtn protocol) and over the past week have seen lots of inflammation. While I realize that's good, his gums are SO red and inflamed now, and getting worse each day.

I thought you might like to know how it's going for a mandible tumor, and anyone else doing a Google search in the same sad situation.

My only question -- his gums can only expand so much. Is there anything we can do??? I'm worried they will continue to expand and eventually split. It's very painful.

Liz of NaturalCatCareBlog said...

Dr. Yasson,
I'm so happy to have found your blog. Thank you for it. Cancer in animals is a big topic for me. Neoplasene--I'm fascinated. So here's my big question about it: Can you provide any information about the importance of constant continued dosage? It's my understanding that with killing cancer,if you slow down (lower the dose or stop too soon) it gives any tiny remaining cancer cells a chance to grow--and these will be stronger, faster growing cells, right? (As with bacteria.) I think this may be a very important fact that those of us who aren't doctors/vets do not realize.

Dr Yasson said...

@ Anon - I would theorize the URI "flare up" was likely an immune system stimulated to respond to a latent infection, or some stray nests of cancer cells in nasal mucous membrane. Yes, they can split if they swell. I would recommend CoQ10 in cases like this. Very helpful.

Dr Yasson said...

@ Liz - there is no documented resistance reaction with Neoplasene, however there is another dynamic that could be in place here. Tumors produce a substance known as TSF, Tumor Suppression Factor. It is the ultimate monopoly weapon. A large tumor will secrete it and suppress others from developing. Once it has been removed from the body by cell death via Neoplasene (or even by surgery, chemical chemotherapy, or radiation, too)the suppression effect is lifted and the cells left behind get to grow unhindered.

Maintenance dose after-treatment is very important. Most vets know this if they are following the product guidelines. Often the maintenance dose is needed indefinitely.

It is also very important to wake up the sailors to fix the leak in the boat (get the body healthy!) and not just bail it out! This is the difference between true cure and just suppression or palliation.

Kathy said...

Dear Dr. Yasson,

My vet is treating my beagle who has TCC bladder tumor. He is giving him bladder infusion therapy with neoplasene and piroxicam. It may appear that the tumor is growing as I am seeing blood in his urine again. Do you think that if my vet gave him oral neoplasene with the bladder infusion therapy this would help him? Also can I give graviola with neoplasene? Thank you Kathy

Anonymous said...

Dear Dr. Yasson:

My Airedale started on Neoplasene for a nasal tumour last week. He was getting drops into his nostril once a day as well as 1cc in his food. On the fourth day, half an hour after giving him his nasal drops he started bleeding very dark blood and passing blood clots. I could not slow down the bleeding at all. I had to bring him to an emergency clinic (it was the long weekend) and he was treated for 48 hours. It took 15 hrs to slow down the bleeding. The Clinic did not know of neoplasine but they were very good at monitoring him. He had his own private "nurse" for 24 hrs. It cost a lot of $$$ but he is worth it. I brought him to my regular vet Monday after he was released from emerge. The vet said that what had happened did not surprise her. One thing that I did notice is that he no longer makes a snoring sound and appears to be breathing much better. The vet advised to continue the oral neoplasene in his food and we will resume the nasal drops in a few weeks when she thinks he is ready. Instead of giving it everyday we will be giving it Monday through to Thursday. If he starts a heavy bleed I would bring him in to his regular vet where the bleeding would be controlled by using natural remedies as well as acupuncture. This is quite a journey!!I read up on Neoplasene on the web and am very impressed with how it is helping animals. It would be great if it could be used for cancer in humans. My husband died of lung cancer twelve years ago and I am certain the chemo and radiation killed him!! I know for a fact that it did torture him! In any case I am so thankful that my vet recommended neoplasine for my dog. I just pray that it helps him!

Jennifer said...

Hello Dr. Yasson,

We have a Golden with internal Histiocytic Sarcoma. He has his spleen removed along with two tumors. The largest being about 12cmx12cm. It was believed to be localized at the time of surgery, but of course we were still given 3 to 4 months at best. We have been following the doggy cancer diet and making his food along with giving him some other alternative suppliments, the most important being Neoplasene. He's been tolerating it very well and has never been sick to his stomach. He's started on .8 ccs 2x a day and we upped it to 1 cc 2x a day 3 weeks ago. He's 65-70lbs and is one his 7th week of Neo. Our vet is happy with the .8cc dose, but my husband and I are concerned that it's not enough. We're looking for a second opinion and worring if we should raise it even more. According to Dr. Fox's protocols (if I'm reading it right) he should be around 2.1 ccs at the top of his treatment. I know you have to gradually get there because it's a powerful drug, but we're almost half through his estimated survival time. It's keeping us up at night. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Anonymous said...

Dr. Yason, my 13 yr old VERY active and happy aussie started limping 4 days ago and was diagnosed with early stage bone cancer not yet in lungs with amp recommended. I have treated another dog of mine with herbs/nutrition for lymphosarcoma yrs ago with EXCELLENT results. SO if this was your dog would you amp and follow up holistically with maybe mushrooms, k9 immunity, herbs, and other holistic options or would you leave the leg and just use holistic options. So stressed and vets push for a fast amp. I have fed him raw his whole life, never vaxed for any reason and no chemical use on him.
What would you do. HE acts like he is 5 to 8 yrs old before he started limping. Now there is swelling and he is on tramadol for pain and he is not himself but still has a major spark saying he is not ready to leave planet earth. Any help/ideas are appreciated so much.
Tonita

Dr Yasson said...

Tonita, Neoplasene is extremely helpful in osteosarcoma cases, and actually very gentle. Amputation as a "debulking" method virtually always increases the chances of survival, but the quality of life depends on the personality ot the individual patient.

Anonymous said...

My dog was exhibiting symptoms of a dental issue, vet gave antibiotics and pain pills, Merri seemed better, back to normal for about a week, then the symptoms came again, drooling, not eating her full serving of food (kibble, vegetarian) so I took her in so she could have anesthesia and the vet could inspect her teeth, and possible extract the problem tooth. The Dr called me, immediately after they put her under, they had found a lump, or tumor on her tongue. I've looked all over online, and all I see are things about tumors on the gums, or body, I am so scared...the surgical tech called me back, she said they took a biopsy and if it is cancer, there is not much they can do-I am hoping and praying it's benign, but deep down I know it's bad. Could neoplasene help in this kind of tumor?

Sandie Riendeau said...

Dr. Yasson

My dog Apollo is a 10 year old Cane Corso. He went in for surgery two days ago to have two abscessed teeth removed and a tumor was found that is cancer that caused the two teeth to abscess. I am considering using the Neoplasene to treat him. I've read both good and bad things about it. My vet said it is a very slow growing type of cancer so that is good. Do you think that this could possibly be an option for Apollo. My vet has never heard about it and is doing her research and is very interested to see if it can help.

Sandie

Anonymous said...

This is the only blog where I read oral Neoplasene can cause open wounds. My dog is on oral Neoplasene for the past 10 days. I see a gray bump on his thigh with red streaks and it seems like the skin will open up. How often do oral treatment cause open wounds? Is it very rare?

Dr Michele Yasson said...

I have seen it happen once in a dog with Mast Cell Tumors. They were superficial - just under the skin, so when they started to decay the skin over them became open lesions. Also, the formulator of Neoplasene, Dr Terry Fox, had the same results with the same cancer in himself (see the treatment guide at buckmtbotanicals.com).
Good luck with your pet!

Anonymous said...

Our 11 year old maltese was diagnosed with mast cell cancer last march. She had surgery to remove the tumor. Than she began taking blood palace, homeopathic immune drops, antioxidant, zynergy and first element. She switched to a raw diet. She was great until September when a tumor came back.This time the tumor was removed, neoplasene ws injected around site. She began an oral dose of neoplasene. All supplements were taken away and the diet was changed from raw to cooked. She ahs had 3 reoccurences and they have been treated with injectable and topical. They are in the genital area and this is very difficult. No anti inflammatory was given. Pain is an issue. Buck Mountain says to increase oral dose and if she has nausea give her remeron. We don't know what to do. Do you have any advise

Maria G Argandona Johnson said...

My 12 year old Akita has been diagnosed with osteosarcoma on her left scapula. I would like to avoid ampuation and give neoplasene a try. Does it work well with osteosarcoma? Thank you.

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Dr. Yasson is unable to diagnose specific cases through her blog, but comments about her posts are always welcome! If you would like to discuss your specific case please contact us at info@holvet.net and we will be happy to help.